Agalinis fasciculata

beach false foxglove
Family

Scrophulariaceae

Leaf Arrangement

fascicled

Leaf Margin

entire

Leaf Type

simple

Leaf Shape

linear

Growth Form

forb

Flower Color

pink, purple, white

Flower Month

March - October

Height (meters)

0.4 - 1.8

Milky Sap

No

Armed/Unarmed

Unarmed

Origin

native

Lifespan

annual

Growing Season

Warm season


Wetland Class

FAC

Wetland Coefficient of Conservatism

6

Prairie Coefficient of Conservatism

3

Field Characters

Similar to A. oligphylla in that its leaves are appressed to the stem and small but A. fasciculata has auxiliary fascicles (see above). Its stems are more or less cylindrical and slightly tapering, rough to the touch, and covered with very short hairs, while the stems of A. oligphylla are more or less square with ridges. It is also similar to A. purpurea which can be distinguished by a lack of fascicles and leaves to 4 cm long with a smooth and angled stem. Most members of the genus Agalinis turn black when dry. Similar to A. purpurea, but stems scabrous to scaberulous, leaves always in fascicles, and the terminal racemes usually distinct. Leaf shape: parallel margins.

Cultural Information

Seed sprouts readily when planted fresh in pots or in the ground. Unplanted seed should be stored dry in sealed containers in a refrigerator. There are approximately 11,000,000/lb.

Animal Use

Larval hosts for the Buckeye butterfly (Junonia coenia).

Natural History

Many species of the genus Agalinis are considered to be parasitic on the roots of other plants. Found on sand dunes, in salt marshes, old fields, and pineywoods of southeast Texas and all of Louisiana except the Atchafalaya Basin and associated coastal areas.

Habitat

Dry or moist soils in savannahs, open weedy areas, open flatwoods, dune hollows, and tidal marshes.